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Showing posts from April, 2020

Series on Asian Studies in Australia

Ed Aspinall and I have launched a special blog series on the state of the field of Asian Studies on the Asian Currents blog of the Asian Studies Association of Australia.  This looks across the disciplines (law, political science, international relations, anthropology, history); languages (Japanese, Korean, Indonesian, Chinese) and area studies (Mainland Southeast Asia, Indonesia, South Asia, China, Northeast Asia, and Asian diasporas) The series includes: Asian Politics in Australian Universities , Michael Barr Evolution of Mainland Southeast Asia Studies over the last 20 years , Patrick Jory Twenty Years of Korean Studies in Australia , Ruth Barraclough Chinese Studies in Australian Universities , Anne McLaren Australian International Relations and Asia , Jennifer Canfield and Mathew Davies Anthropology of/with Asia in Australia , Tanya Jakimow Asian Law in Australian Universities: Research Centres as Critical Institutional Commitments , Melissa Crouc

Asian Law in Australian Universities: Research centres as critical institutional commitments

*this was first published at Asian Currents, April 2020     Asian Law in Australian Universities: Research centres as critical institutional commitments Melissa Crouch , Law School, University of New South Wales (UNSW Sydney) In November 2019, Edward Aspinall and I convened a workshop on the state of Asian Studies in Australia. Bringing together leading academics in Asian Studies, we discussed the state of the field for the past two decades (2000-2020) across the disciplines (law, political science, international relations, anthropology, history), languages (Japanese, Korean, Indonesian, Chinese) and area studies (Mainland Southeast Asia, Indonesia, South Asia, China, Northeast Asia, and Asian diasporas). In this post, I reflect on the field of Asian law. While law as a discipline is grouped as part of the social sciences, it became clear from our discussions that the study and research of Asian Law has a distinctive history in Australian universities. The study

The impact of Covid-19 on research

Covid-19 is currently disrupting academic publishing in a number of ways.  There are disruptions to the global supply chain for the manufacture and distribution of printed journals. The following publishers have halted journal printing until further notice: Cambridge University Press (from 25 March 2020) Taylor & Francis (from 10 April) S ome journal editors or editing boards have suspended or delayed the review or publication process for academic journals.  On the other hand, some publishers are providing open access content for a limited period of time. See the following links from the UNSW library  and the  ANU library , or select publishers websites such as  OUP .  The University of California Press has opened free access to all its journals until the end of June 2020 Hart Publishing is currently offering free access for libraries to its online platform,  Bloomsbury Collections , until the end of May. To enable access for your institution, email Hart at O