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Showing posts from September, 2016

Indonesian Business, Law and Society scholarships

There are currently 5 scholarships of $5000 available for UNSW students who apply for the ACICIS program on Indonesian Business, Law and Society (IBLS) to commence in semester 1, 2017. The IBLS is a semester-long program hosted by the  Indonesian Islamic University  (UII), Yogyakarta. Taught in English, this program provides students with a comprehensive understanding of Indonesian business, law and society at regional and global levels, as seen from an Indonesian perspective, while developing necessary critical skills to enter their respective fields. Students enrol in subjects at UII’s International Schools located within the Faculty of Economics and the Faculty of Law. These subjects cover a range of thematic areas within business, law and society.  The IBLS also offers students the option to undertake a ‘professional placement’, enabling students to put their studies into practice and gain a real-world experience outside the classroom. Students are placed with local commerci

Podcast updates on Southeast Asia

Missed the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre conference on Politics in Asia? Podcasts by each of the speakers are now available online Allen Hicken on Southeast Asian Politics Mark Thompson on the Philippines Melissa Crouch on Myanmar Michael Barr on Singapore Jacqui Baker on Indonesia Aderito Soares on East Timor Jonathan Bogais on Cambodia Meredith Weiss on Malaysia Aim Sinpeng on Thailand

Jokowi's Islamist challenge: curbing terrorism and religious intolerance

I n Indonesia,  an attempted bomb attack on a church on Sunday  has again left religious minorities deeply shaken. Allegedly linked to Islamic State (Isis), the attack by a lone man may be more symptomatic of historic trends in terrorism against minorities in  Indonesia . In fact, the area near Medan, a city of over two million people, has been the site of recent tensions. Just last month, an attack was carried out on Confucian temples in Tanjung Balai, not far from Medan. Last year, a mob burnt down several churches that allegedly did not have a permit in the neighbouring province of Aceh. These attacks are just the latest in a long line of local terrorism that targets minority groups. Symbolic attacks on places of worship are just one example. One way to appreciate the sharp escalation of conflict in Indonesia is to compare pre-1998 and post-1998 rates of attacks on places of worship. Prior to the democratic transition in 1998, there were reportedly over 450 attacked or